PLACES OF JACOPONE

Listed below are the most significant places associated with Jacopone, either because he stayed there or because they preserve evidence of his life and its events. In and around Todi, a ‘Jacoponean itinerary’ can become an interesting opportunity for non-conventional tourism.

In the city

FONTI DI SCANNABECCO E PALAZZO PONGELLI 

CHIESA DI SAN FORTUNATO 

CHIESA DI SAN SILVESTRO 

 

PALAZZO DEL POPOLO 

CONVENTO DI MONTE SANTO 

MONUMENTO A JACOPONE 

ISTITUTO CIUFFELLI

CIMITERO VECCHIO

 

  • Between Palazzo Pongelli and the Scannabecco fountains,
    is probably where the home of Jacopone and his family was located. In Palazzo Pongelli there are 17th-century frescoes illustrating episodes from the legendary life of Jacopone.
  • The church of S. Silvestro
    contains the most credible image of Jacopone, painted by an unknown Umbrian artist about twenty years after the poet’s death. The image of Jacopone in prayer is painted with obvious empathy and veneration, even if without the typical saintly halo recognized by the Vatican.
  • San Fortunato
    is the most important place in Jacopone’s life story. The great church and friary (now occupied by a high school) were built in the later 14th century, but a smaller church and friary stood here in Jacopone’s time. Here Jacopone lived for the most important eighteen years of his life and then for five painful years of imprisonment. In the crypt of San Fortunato is his tomb.
  • The monument to Jacopone
    at the bottom of the steps of San Fortunato, was erected by the city of Todi in 1930 on the seventh centenary of the poet’s birth. It is the work of the Florentine sculptor Valmore Gemignani.
  • The Palazzo del Popolo In this palazzo Jacopone may have practiced, for a few years, his profession of legal agent or notary for the Municipality of Todi.
  • Ciuffelli Agricultural Institute
    was a Benedictine monastery in Jacopone’s time, but later became a convent of the Clarisse (Poor Clares) who transferred from Collazzone; it was called Montecristo. Most likely the Clarisse brought with them the mortal remains of Jacopone, which rested in the church of this convent for a period.
  • The convent of Montesanto
    was also, at first, a convent of the Clarisse and Jacopone’s remains may have been transferred here from the convent of Montecristo. From this convent the remains were later transferred to the sacristy of San Fortunato, from where, in 1592, Bishop Cesi had them removed to the tomb of the patron saints of Todi in the crypt.
  • The old Cemetery
    on the descent towards Ponte Rio, was the location of the Hospital of Charity in Jacopone’s time. Jacopone dedicated his laude XVII to the rector, Fra Ranaldo, who graduated in Theology in Paris. St Philip Benizi, the same age and probably a friend of Jacopone, also did charitable work in this hospital.

OUTSIDE THE CITY

MONASTERO DI PANTANELLI

CHIESA DI SAN LORENZO

Collazzone

ROCCA DI CASTEL SAN PIETRO ROMANO

Palestrina

LUNGHEZZA

ROMA

L’AQUILA

NAPOLI

DUOMO DI PRATO

FIRENZE

  • The convent of Pantanelli,
    on the Todi-Orvieto road, in the municipality of Baschi. Jacopone occasionally stayed here during the period he lived as a lay Franciscan and itinerant missionary.
  • The Church of San Lorenzo in Collazzone
    with the remains of the convent of the Clarisse (now private property), where Jacopone spent the last three years of his life.
  • The Fortress of Castel San Pietro Romano
    near Palestrina. Here Jacopone was captured by the soldiers of Pope Boniface and spent a first period of imprisonment before being transferred to the prison of San Fortunato in Todi.
  • The Lunghezza area
    where Jacopone signed the manifesto against Pope Boniface VIII in 1297 – a signature that cost him excommunication and imprisonment.
  • L’ Aquila
    (or perhaps Naples), where Jacopone went as a delegate to meet Pope Celestine V and plead the cause of the ‘Spiritual’ Franciscans
  • Rome
    where Jacopone spent a short period at the Roman Curia, perhaps engaged in study, in 1292-94. This was probably on the initiative of Cardinal Matteo di Acquasparta, former bishop of Todi and a former Minister General of the Franciscan Order.
  • The Cathedral of Prato
    where the Renaissance artist Paolo Uccello painted, with great feeling, the most famous portrait of Jacopone. It remains a sign of the veneration in Tuscany for the great poet.
  • Florence
    We include this city, which Jacopone may never have visited, because here the Florentine priest and typographer Francesco Bonaccorsi printed theeditio princeps (first printed edition) of the Laudi, without which we would know nothing certain today about Jacopone’s poetry. 

British Museum of London e il Condé Museum di Chantilly in where some of the most important medieval manuscripts of Jacopone’s Laudi are kept.

Italiano (Italian)